Installation View, Allen Jones, Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, 25 November 2015 - 23 January 2016, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London (38)

Colour Matters

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Installation View, Allen Jones, Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, 25 November 2015 - 23 January 2016, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.jpg

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Installation View, Allen Jones, Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, 25 November 2015 - 23 January 2016, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London (19)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

 

Installation View, Allen Jones, Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, 25 November 2015 - 23 January 2016, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London (40)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Installation View, Allen Jones, Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, 25 November 2015 - 23 January 2016, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London (23)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Black Shoes, 2015, mixed media, clear perspex body, with objects inside, and painted perspex head, 198 x 70 x 53 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Red Shoes, 2015, Perspex and mixed media, 198 x 60 cm x 45 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Green Shoes, 2015, Perspex and mixed media, 186 x 60 x 45 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Red Queen, 2014, mixed media, timber figure, spray painted, perspex head, 200 x 55 x 55 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Blue Queen, 2015, mixed media, timber figure, spray painted, perspex head, 193 x 55 x 55 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, Cover Story, 2015, spray painted fibreglass with leather accessories and stainless steel stand, 160 x 45 x 45 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Allen Jones, A Model Model, 2014-15, polished stainless steel body, spray painted cast resin bust, 185.5 x 86 x 79 cm, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Studio of Allen Jones, photographer Eamonn McCabe, courtesy Studio of Allen Jones and Marlborough Fine Art, London (1)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.,

 

Studio of Allen Jones, photographer Eamonn McCabe, courtesy Studio of Allen Jones and Marlborough Fine Art, London (2)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

Studio of Allen Jones, photographer Eamonn McCabe, courtesy Studio of Allen Jones and Marlborough Fine Art, London (4)

Allen Jones: Colour Matters, Marlborough Fine Art, courtesy the artist and Marlborough Fine Art, London.

 

 

Colour Matters

Allen Jones_Marlborough Fine Art Gallery_25 November 2015 – 23 January 2016

British Pop Artist allen Jones latest exhibition at the Marlborough Fine Art Gallery once again positions the female figure centre stage. The work displayed ranges from his classic hyper realistic pieces to beautiful floating ‘cabinet’ like silhouettes. Allen here shows a departure from wood and starts to explore with perspex, using and exploring its material properties to define a new language for sculpture.

The exhibition commences with the cut out steel piece which reflects the beginning of Allen’s permanent interest in the three dimensional. In the mid eighties the artist realised that he was painting shapes to make them come alive and it seemed that if he actually cut them out they would fall over due to the lack of structure of the canvas and or paper. However the simple act of folding in order to generate a certain structural strength revealed a new world to the artist who was interested in the method of folding as a means to free any figurative association, ‘its not a descriptive fold but rather an organic one.’

In this sense the artist draws a parallel with Matisse by revealing his interest with the late artists cut outs which represented a departure from his craftsmanship as a painter. As such Allen sees his steel sculptures as being a way of exploring that possibility, what happens if he took away the one thing that he most instinctively did which is to describe the figure.

The red and blue queen, with which the exhibition continues, are on the other hand a homage to HV Westermann an American artist who painted two sculptures called The Red King and Silver Queen. These two, differently to Allen’s, were carved in wood and painted in an eye gloss finish.

When going to New York Allen was scared he would be slightly overwhelmed by being in the center of the artistic world and he thought he would take some work with him as insurance . The idea that one could describe volume in a Plano graphic flat way just as geographic map where this flat shape through the differentiation through color inspired him. In a loose way he started formulating the idea of having the head of the sculpture as a floating color thing above this totemic column, however at the time Perspex was not widely used by artists and he thus used cut out flat shapes which would then be embellished with paint. At the core of this new work and as a a continuous thread was the idea of liberating colour from the flat surface. However these two sculptures reflect the transformation of this interest with the materiality and properties of Perspex. the artist was specifically interested in the ability of perspex to concentrate colour along the edges where as a result the form becomes alive through this fleeting line which exists through the viewer and the art work in the moment they perceive the object.

The purely transparent figure in the following room is not only the first of the series but also Allen’s favourite. The lack of painting allows for the figure to behave and come to alive solely through the light reflected upon it so that what the viewer perceives is not the structure as a surface but rather as a floating drawn edge. These figures are seen as acquiring new meaning when photographed as the artist sees the medium of the camera lense as a way to render them into paintings.

The work of Kate in stainless steel is a rare portrait of the artist who doesn’t like to capture the specific likeness of an individual especially today where ‘photography has sub served the role of the painter in recording similarity.’

The exhibition continues with one of his classic molds, which once again explore his obsession with the figure. Allen here focuses on the movement of the figure and how it presents itself to the viewer. He moreover expands on his concern with the relationship between the figure and the painted surface, how it can stand in front of a canvas or how it can be embellished.

The exhibition concludes with his bronze body armor, which was made in the seventies for a film the artist had written but was never realized. It was later used for as an indument to photograph the model Kate Moss.

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