A Continuum

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Line Drawing, Students, Texture

A Continuum

Sai Rojanapirom

Project

Steel House (Location: 203Chautauqua Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles)

Dealing with the site of the Eames House, the project reimagines a steel house that capitalized on existing “structures” on the site which are the line of existing eucalyptus trees and concrete retaining wall.

Along with basic housing program, Robert Irwin’s acrylics column sculptures are chosen as a collection to be house here which is open to public viewing, while creating a comfortable private living area for the residence.

The heart of the house embraces existing row of eucalyptus trees as central Meadow Gallery, introducing new setting and experiences for the sculptures, while immerse them as part of natural settings.

Connected by 3 exterior courts,4 boxes houses distinct programmatic spaces; living, sleeping, office/workshop, garage. Skylights are introduced in the living area as the aesthetic feature as well as to help light up a rather deep, enclosed space.

Please let me know if you need any more information regarding the projects. Hope to hear back from you guys soon!

2016_Shorter Work Sample_Achariyar Rojanapirom PLEASE

Steel House_Location: 203 Chautauqua Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles

03_steel-house

Steel House_Location: 203 Chautauqua Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles

02_steel-house

Steel House_Location: 203 Chautauqua Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles

Collective Housing in Frogtown (Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles)

The ambition of the project is to design an animated residential community that seeks opportunities for self-sufficiency and communal living through an integration of city block ideology, in order to induce social interaction, visibility, and porosity which is otherwise lacking in known large vertical housing typology.
Frogtown, located in Los Angeles,can be seen as an island, enclosed by LA river and I-5 freeway, is disconnected from the rest of the city and is absence in basic amenities within a walkable distance.
Unite d’Habitation is an example of such housing that is organized to accommodate the living spaces, as well as the public, communal spaces. However, it presents problems regarding issues of public connectivity, daylighting and securities.
This project harvests from those problems and addressing them by cracking model of Unite d’Habitation, open in both residential units design as well as overall spatial and programmatic volume of the building. By creating an interlocking system of residential units, it is efficiently allowing for placement of more units in the building, creating shared roof communal space between the unit and allow for sunlight to pass through, reaching the bottom of the complex.
Public programs such as markets, library, theater, recreational center etc. are scattered along a large elevated platform covered by central glass atrium which connects all the programs together, depending on neighborhoods.
Concrete structural tubes are placed strategically to accommodate overall structural integrity of the building as well as served as the light well to light up spaces throughout the complex.
Much like Unite, by placing the complex on one side of the site allows for a large open space for the rest of the community.
Ultimately, the building is hope to serve not only for its inhabitants but as infrastructures that serve the rest of the community and rejuvenate Frogtown to fulfill its potential.
2. Steel House (Location: 203 Chautauqua Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles)
Dealing with the site of the Eames House, the project reimagines a steel house that capitalized on existing “structures” on the site which are the line of existing eucalyptus trees and concrete retaining wall.
Along with basic housing program, Robert Irwin’s acrylics column sculptures are chosen as a collection to be house here which is open to public viewing, while creating a comfortable private living area for the residence.
The heart of the house embraces existing row of eucalyptus trees as central Meadow Gallery, introducing new setting and experiences for the sculptures, while immerse them as part of natural settings.
Connected by 3 exterior courts,4 boxes houses distinct programmatic spaces; living, sleeping, office/workshop, garage. Skylights are introduced in the living area as the aesthetic feature as well as to help light up a rather deep, enclosed space.

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

FINAL BOARD_120715

Collective Housing in Frogtown_Location: Frogtown, Los Angeles

Interview

Who influences you graphically?

I try to represent each project differently, depending on what I tried to communicate. Although, rather than looking only at architecture drawings, I tend to look at different artists, sculptures, photography and my traveling for appropriate color palettes, composition, representation techniques. Currently, I’m very much interested in László Moholy-Nagy’s photography, Xavier Corbero sculptures and my recent trip to Mexico City.

To what extent did Le Corbusiers not only provide the basis for the thesis and project but for the graphic language as well? 

Although Unité d’Habitation provides the basis for the thesis of the project, I looked at his paintings as much as the building itself for compositional inspiration. He is as much of an artist as an architect, and this sensibility reflected clearly in the design of his architecture, with static mass almost always in combination with fluid sculptural figures.

How important is it to learn from the past to reinvent and change the present/future? How relevant is the past as context in an ever-changing fast moving society?

I believe that nothing is entirely ‘new’ nor it is as productive to just strive for the ‘new’. Every invention, design, idea has residues of the past and we do learn from what exist, consciously or not. Although we are now living in a more transient environment, amplified by the presence of the technology, an accumulation of data, and rapid communication, which of course change the way we live, our ergonomic requirements still remain very much unchanged and we are still dealing with the same problems we did 50-70 years ago, architecturally; how to bring sunlight into the space, congestions, ventilation, provision of communal spaces etc. Corbusier or even Palladio are still very much relevant amongst many of the contemporaries. What’s fascinating about Corbusier in particular is his ability to see what existed in a completely new light. for example, Unite d’Habitation is referenced to the cruise ship but also of the rooms in an old Italian monasteries. By building upon and be creative with the existing solutions, mistakes and models, interesting and provocative work can emerge.

What is the purpose and effect of drawing and collaging elements from artists as Hockney to create and represent your vision?

The site is surreal. where the line of colorful Eucalyptus trees in front of the Eames House is the anchoring point of the whole project. Hockney’s painting of ‘Woldgate Woods (2006)’ represent perfectly what I wanted to capture; vibrant, chromatic, fictitious quality of the context. It became clear that his representation and ideals are appropriate for the project.

What dictates your choice of colour palette for the various aspects within an image? (structure as monochromatic- furniture as coloured) 

In this project the house is merely a vessel for the context, as well as the user. It’s muted quality allows the surrounding and users to take dominance, through choice of monochromatic reflected materials. Colors of the architecture are the color of Eucalyptus trees, occupants and their possessions.

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